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Water Line Repairs Scheduled for 7/13

Water line repairs will start on Thursday, July 13 on West Hightower Trail at approximately 9:00am.  The first repair will be in front of the Elementary School and the second repair will be at 586 West Hightower Trail.  Residents in those areas may experience temporary water outages throughout the day.  Crews expect to complete the repairs by 4:00 pm.  There will be one lane traffic in those areas and the City is asking that the public slow down during repairs and be courteous and mindful of our traffic control flaggers and the safety of our City crews.

Call City Hall (770-464-2380) if there are questions or concerns.

Regarding Pool Guidelines

Relaxing in a pool is a great way to beat the heat of the summer.  In order to address pool safety, there are building code and zoning requirements related to pools.  Many are not aware that permits are required for outdoor pools.  These requirements have been in place for years, however the City of Social Circle has only been administering the building permits within the City since July 2015.  Prior to that time, Walton County provided that service.

Please be aware that permits are required for new pool installations, both above ground and below ground.  If your pool was built or installed after July 2015 and there was no permit obtained, you will need to come to City Hall and obtain your pool permit.

There is not a fee for an above ground pool with no structure surrounding it.  A barrier is required.

If you build a deck around the above ground pool you would need a minimum permit fee of $100.00 for the structure/deck.

The purpose of the barrier is to provide significant restricted access and reliable entry points to a pool so that children cannot gain access unless an adult provides such access.  The barrier can be the wall of the pool itself if 48 inches tall. If the pool is lower than 48 inches, please remover the ladder off the pool when no one is home.  The City of Social Circle’s main concern is the safety of pool access for all adults and children.

Inground pools do have a pool permit fee of $300.00 includes electrical and plumbing.  An inground pool does require a permanent fence, wall, building wall or combination. Permanent means “not being able to be removed, lifted or relocated without the use of a tool.

If your pool was installed prior to July 2015, and you would like the City to review it we will do that at no charge.  Otherwise, no action is needed.  The City will respond to any complaints or concerns that are received relative to Code compliance and advise the property owner if there are any issues to be addressed.

The City of Social Circle hopes this helps in any confusion of the pool requirements posted in the newsletter, but if you have questions please contact Barbara Schlageter at 770-464-6905 or bschalgeter@socialcirclega.com.

Leaf and Brush Collection Update

The city has acquired a new leaf and brush truck to improve services and will be back on your normal schedule for leaf and brush pickup in the same week starting Monday the 19th of June, 2017.

We want to thank the public for being very patient while we repaired and acquired new equipment to improve your service delivery.  Staff have been working very hard to get back on schedule and provide you the best service possible for leaf, grass clippings, and brush removal.

To better serve you we want to work as a team with the public to ensure services are provided in a timely manner and equipment is in top working order.  The following are some tips for ensuring our crews provide the best serve possible:

  1. Do not put trash such as rocks, metal, dirt, and any item they may damage the blades on the leaf and brush machine.  These items can cause equipment failure and costly repairs preventing the crews from providing quality service to you.
  2. Separate leaf piles from brush piles and keep limbs to approximately 4 inches or less in diameter.
  3. Crews will normally spend 15 minutes on a leaf or brush pile. If they spend longer than that then the piles are too big causing the crews to get behind delaying service to other citizens. However, they can spend 15 minutes each week on a large pile until it is gone.
  4. If you see our trucks pass your pile of leaves and brush without picking it up, their trucks are full and need to be emptied. They will return to finish your piles.  However, if they miss your pile by mistake then call City Hall and request pick up.
  5. If you forget to put your pile of leaves and brush next to the road on your scheduled pickup day crews will pick it up the following week on your scheduled day of pickup.
  6. If you see a hang tag on your pile of leaves or brush, then there is a reason for them not picking up your pile. Please read the tag and take the appropriate actions.  Once that is complete call City Hall for pickup or wait until your next scheduled pickup day.
  7. There will be times when your leaf and brush pickup may be delayed due to equipment failure and weather. However, we will make every effort to pick them up in a timely manner.

Participants needed for Georgia Initiative for Community Housing Stakeholder’s Group

Child's drawing of houseGeorgia Initiative for Community Housing (GICH) helps communities improve their quality of life and economic vitality through the development of locally-based housing and revitalization strategies. This is achieved through technical assistance, collaboration, and facilitation. Examples of initiatives that have been undertaken by communities as a result of their participation in GICH include targeting a distressed neighborhood for revitalization, developing multi-family tax credit apartments, and obtaining CDBG and CHIP grants for housing counseling, down payment assistance and sewer/water infrastructure improvements. For more information, contact City Manager, Adele Schirmer aschirmer@socialcirclega.com. If you are interested in participating in a Stakeholders Group to work on City Housing and Neighborhood issues, please let us know by the end of June.

For more information on the GICH initiative: http://www.fcs.uga.edu/fhce/gich

 

IsoNova Technologies LLC Breaks Ground on Odor Control Equipment

IsoNova Technologies LLC and the City of Social Circle are pleased to announce approval of construction and installation of a Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer at the company’s Social Circle facility, a multimillion dollar project that will clean its plant emissions of particulate matter.

The City applauds ISONOVA’s commitment to the City to implement this project and we look forward to its completion and the resolution of this longstanding community concern.  The ground breaking ceremony was held May 24, 2017 at 5:30 PM at Isonova Technologies LLC, 1022 E Hightower Trail.

City of Social Circle Press Release

IsoNova Press Release

Water to be turned off for hydrant repair

On Thursday, May 18, water will be turned off to the following addresses on S Cherokee Rd while City Crews replace a fire hydrant at Cherokee Rd and Cannon Drive.

304 S Cherokee Rd
379 S Cherokee Rd
399 S Cherokee Rd
392 S Cherokee Rd
415 S Cherokee Rd
434 S Cherokee Rd
452 S Cherokee Rd
462 S Cherokee Rd

The water should be from about 9:00 am – 2:00 pm .

Municipal Clerks Week, May 7 – 13

Susan Roper, City ClerkMunicipal Clerks Week ProclamationIn observance of Municipal Clerks Week, the City of Social Circle wishes to recognize our City Clerk, Susan Roper, for all she does to keep things at the City running smoothly.

Thank you, Susan, for all you do! We couldn’t do all we do without you!

The International Institute of Municipal Clerks (IIMC), a professional non-profit association with 14,500 members comprised of City, Town, Township, Village, Borough, Deputy and County Clerks throughout the United States, Canada and 15 other countries, announces its 48th Annual Municipal Clerks Week—May 7 through May 13, 2017. This event features a week-long series of activities aimed at increasing the public’s awareness of Municipal Clerks and the vital services they provide for local government and the community.

IIMC has sponsored Municipal Clerks Week since 1969. In 1984 and in 1994, Presidents Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton, respectively, signed a Proclamation officially declaring Municipal Clerks Week the first full week of May and recognizing the essential role Municipal Clerks play in local government. During this week, Municipal Clerks throughout the world will host open houses and tours of the Municipal Clerk’s office, visit local schools and participate in other various events.

“The true worth of the Municipal and Deputy Clerk is often not realized,” said IIMC President Vincent Buttiglieri, MMC, and Municipal Clerk for the Township of Ocean, New Jersey. “But Clerks perform some of the principal functions of the democratic process.” “One of the most important responsibilities Clerks administer is advising their municipality’s council of the legislative restrictions that apply to the ordinances and resolutions they wish to enact,” said Buttiglieri.

Municipal and Deputy Clerks’ main function is to serve as the council’s foundation. Other duties include, but are not limited to, preparing agendas, taking minutes, maintaining ordinance and resolutions files, keeping the municipality’s historical records, processing permits and serving as the clearinghouse for information about the local government.

They also record the actions of the various commissions and committees appointed by the council. Many serve as financial officers or treasurers and, in small municipalities, may act as chief administrative officers. Another important responsibility is administering part or all of the local election functions.

“The public often takes the administration of an election for granted,” stated Buttiglieri. “In reality, it takes Municipal Clerks months to organize and prepare this key element in the democratic process which must be done correctly for the whole system to work.”

One of local government’s oldest positions is the Municipal Clerk. Their duties have expanded over the years and, today, modern technology assists them with their increasing responsibilities. To stay abreast of new computer applications, records management and other relevant information, many Municipal and Deputy Clerks return to the classroom to increase their knowledge of these issues, learn new material and sharpen old skills.

“Because some elements of government are constantly changing, Clerks must stay current of changes so they can advise their council and inform their community,” said Buttiglieri. “As the focus of each level of government changes, Clerks must also adapt.”

Founded in 1947, IIMC is a professional nonprofit association with more than 14,500 members throughout North America and 15 other countries, representing municipalities with populations of 1,000 to more than 8 million. IIMC prepares its membership to meet the challenge of the diverse role of the Municipal Clerk by providing services and continuing educational development opportunities in 46 permanent college-and university-based learning centers. IIMC offers Municipal and Deputy Clerks a Certified Municipal Clerk Program (CMC), a Master Municipal Clerk (MMC) Program and other opportunities to benefit members and the government entities they serve. A 26-member Board of Directors governs IIMC.

 

Siren Testing Starts 5/3

The City will be conducting audible testing of the emergency response sirens at 10:00 am  on the first Wednesday of every month. The alarms will sound and then announce that it is a test.

The tests will not happen if there is possibility of bad weather to avoid confusion.

The fire department will only activate the tornado sirens if an immediate threat exists to the City or South Walton County. Tornado warnings normally occur with little or no warning. If you hear the tornado sirens during a storm take shelter immediately.

Citizens are also encouraged to sign up for the Everbridge Public Notification System on the Walton County Government website.(https://member.everbridge.net/index/453003085611716#/login)  This system allows you to receive emergency warning messages via cell phone, email, and home phone.

Fire Hydrant Testing – May 2

The fire department will be testing the following fire hydrants today (5/2/17).

579- 5023 East Hightower Trail
Holly Street
Oak Drive
Sweetgum
Poplar Ave
Spruce Street
N Dogwood Ave
Jones Drive
Laurel Street
Misty Lane
Pine Circle Ct.
King Street
Spring Street
Sycamore Street

The water may be cloudy or discolored after they have finished. Let the water run for a few minutes and it will clear up.

North Georgia Burn Ban Boosts Air Quality

A ban on outdoor burning begins May 1 in 54 Georgia counties, primarily in the northern half of the state. The Georgia Forestry Commission works with the state Environmental Protection Division annually to remind people that during the hot summer months, ground level ozone increases, which can negatively impact air quality and people’s health. Burning yard and land clearing debris may produce smoke and particulate matter that are linked to lung and heart disease in humans.

“From May through September, we all enjoy being outdoors,” said Frank Sorrells, Chief of Protection for the Georgia Forestry Commission. “Open burning is limited during these months to help improve air quality and reduce the risk of wildfire.”

Sorrells said Georgia’s ongoing drought has contributed to increased wildfire activity, and above normal temperatures and below normal rainfall are predicted for the next couple of months, especially in the southern and coastal regions. While campfires don’t fall under the burn ban, everyone is urged to be extremely cautious when doing any type of outdoor cooking or tending to campfires.

The burn ban will be in effect from May 1 – September 30, 2017. The 54 Georgia counties affected are: Banks, Barrow, Bartow, Bibb, Butts, Carroll, Catoosa, Chattooga, Cherokee, Clarke, Clayton, Cobb, Columbia, Coweta, Crawford, Dawson, DeKalb, Douglas, Fayette, Floyd, Forsyth, Fulton, Gordon, Gwinnett, Hall, Haralson, Heard, Henry, Houston, Jackson, Jasper, Jones, Lamar, Lumpkin, Madison, Meriwether, Monroe, Morgan, Newton, Oconee, Paulding, Peach, Pickens, Pike, Polk, Putnam, Richmond, Rockdale, Spalding, Troup, Twiggs, Upson, Walker and Walton.

Residents in Georgia counties not included in the annual burn ban will continue to be required to secure a burn permit from the Georgia Forestry Commission before conducting any outside burning, including prescribed burning. Permits can be requested online at GaTrees.org, or by calling 1-888-OK2-BURN. If conditions are safe for burning, permits will be automatically granted.

“We encourage everyone to become familiar with what types of open burning are allowed in their area,” said Sorrells. “The Georgia Forestry Commission will be closely monitoring weather and fire activity to keep Georgians and their property safe.”

For more information about annual summer burn restrictions, burn permits and services of the Georgia Forestry Commission, visit GaTrees.org.